Dryslwyn Castle – A Proper Welsh Castle

Dryslwyn Castle is a 13th-century castle, thought to be built by one of the Welsh princes of Deheubarth. It sits upon a hill overlooking the Twi Valley and commands some stunning views, even on a cold and rainy day such as this one.

It is one of the most important structures built by a Welsh chieftain still remaining. It is an excellent defensive position and is thought perhaps to have been a fortification in prehistoric times, although no evidence of this remains.

The Best Castle Location? – Llansteffan Castle

On a hill above the estuary of the River Towy in Carmarthenshire sits the magnificent Llansteffan Castle. It was built on the site of an older Iron Age Promontory Fort and has been in use for millennia, and it’s not hard to see why. It’s not only a highly defensible location, but affords some stunning views over the River Towy, and the village of Llansteffan itself. If you go to the top of the tower at the right time, you might even get to see a train in the distance.

Today, it’s all about location, and Llansteffan has got one of the best views of the sea we’ve seen from a castle. It isn’t actually the sea, it’s the estuary of the River Towy with the sea in the distance. Whatever it is, it’s beautiful.

The Biggest Castle in Wales – Caerphilly Castle

A medieval fortification built by Gilbert de Clare in the 13th century in the town of Caerphilly in South Wales. Loads of moats and lakes, it is said to have the most elaborate water defences in Britain. Occupying around 30 acres (12 hectares) it is the second-largest castle in the United Kingdom. One of its defining features is its leaning tower. The south-east tower in the Inner Ward leans outwards at an angle of 10 degrees.

Raglan Castle – Fortress or Palace?

Raglan Castle is a late medieval castle north of the village of Raglan in the county of Monmouthshire in south-east Wales.

The current Raglan castle was built between the 15th and early 17th centuries by the Herberts and the Somersets. It boasts a sizeable hexagonal Keep called the Great Tower or the Yellow Tower of Gwent. The tower was surrounded by a moat and could therefore only be accessed via a drawbridge but to reach this point one must already have negotiated the gatehouse which was itself protected by a drawbridge and twin portcullises. Beyond the gatehouse, are what was once luxurious accommodations.